Too many spinning plates

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Sorry I have neglected this blog for over a year. I’ve come to realise I have too many ideas on the go at once, which whilst great for variety, does not allow much progression. I took a long hard look at what I was doing and I have suspended all work on project Hermes (CD32 expansion) indefinitely. It was not due to technical issues, it was due to support. The original intent of the project was to produce 100 assembled and tested PCBs and then via a third party, sell them, I had a tacit agreement on this. The realisation, in part driven by bad experience in the day job, was that a more complicated design than a ‘simple’ ATX or floppy adaptor, would take a significant amount of my time to support. Currently I spend 8-10 hours a month dealing with enquiries, order packing and support requests for the products I currently sell. Allowing for a design that is more 4-5x more complex with more variables, I can easily see that the support time will increase considerably, easily to 10x the current level. When (not if) it gets to that level of effort, it becomes more of a chore than a fun hobby. This is the time to stop.

I will continue to support the products I currently sell. There are two small, Amiga related, projects, in the final stages of development. Will release details when they are ready. Once released and manufactured, they will be the last Amiga specific projects I work on.

The other projects I work on are increasingly micro-controller based and two of them use CPLDs for video and logic functions. These projects are more generic retro projects. I also develop designs for Radio Control systems, more on this when I finish them. Like most of my current projects, all the design data will be publicly available.

I realise this announcement will disappoint some people. Over the past 10 years, I have, on average, finished 7 projects a year. The past year, I’ve done 2. I’m older now and life has other distractions so I’ve decided to do what is best for me and to actually achieve success on smaller, more manageable projects rather than failure on one large project.

Thank you,

Ian

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